SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
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SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  SWEENEY LAKE mid-century   This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed.   Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.  Location:            Golden Valley, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE mid-century

This home enjoys stunning views of Sweeney Lake from almost anywhere in the home; however it was in need of repair and a significant reorganization of the plan to take full advantage of site.  The project is about the complete restoration and rethinking of this vintage 1965 mid-century gem.  The house is deceivingly large with a full finished lower level and an indoor pool room; however it lived cramped and broken up.  The entry was uninviting and small, the poolroom unused and poorly heated, the kitchen undersized, and the bedrooms and baths poorly accessed. 

Our task was to open up the home through the rethinking of the floor plan and the introduction of a new central axis connecting and organizing the homes functions and spaces around view corridors and existing or new focal points.  The home had beautiful features to build upon; the central brick fireplace, the raised roofs over the living and pool rooms, and the view to the lake itself.  A fully redone exterior and interior preserve the homes proportion and scale, while at the same time bring greater connection to the site and a much needed clarity to the homes organization.

Location:          Golden Valley, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

GRAPHIC NATURE HOUSE

The clients desires: connecting, merging, transitioning, inside and outside, nature and built form, bold, graphic, vertical in expression, welcoming and private.

She is a gardener and he a graphic designer. The gardener is engaged when the house subtly reaches out to nature, and recedes in to accept it by directing views to the yard, inflecting to enclose a tiny rock garden, and projecting private window boxes, each responding to the site and to the owner. The graphic designer is engaged when the materiality of the house begins to read as a bold interplay of dark and light, reflecting the material palette found to exist on the site itself.

The use of materials: concrete, steel, glass, wood, the play of sunlight, the rituals of daily life, the creation of space, are all studied in an attempt to make a home that provides an authentic place of sanctuary.

Location: Roseville, MN
Project Size: 3500 sf
Completed: 2006

Photographer:  Karen Melvin                          

www.karenmelvin.com

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

ST. PAUL HOME

ST. PAUL HOME

Drawing on utility farm buildings, the design of this house is direct in it’s form and organization.  Located in a dense St. Paul neighborhood on a narrow 39’ wide lot, the house draws equally from it’s turn of the century neighbors for scale and materiality.  

The 20’ wide shotgun structure allowed the house to be pushed to the east, opening up the west wall for large windows and the opportunity for an outdoor room. This changed what is normally “nowhere” space between houses into an active extension of the home used to BBQ, play catch, and afford pleasant transition from front to back. 

Life plays out in the home within three space, the living/dining, the kitchen/breakfast, and the porch/outdoor room.  All three are used daily either actively or borrowed.  Each is clearly defined and connected to the others through the careful placement or absence of walls or corners, and made more expansive by increased height, defined sightlines, and exposed structure.

Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Project Size: 2,080 sf
Completed: 2000

Photographer:  Sara Rubinstein

www.rubinsteinphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME ADDITION / REMODEL

LINDEN HILLS HOME ADDITION / REMODEL

"Before" photograph
 

LINDEN HILLS HOME ADDITION / REMODEL

LINDEN HILLS HOME ADDITION / REMODEL

"Before" photograph

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

LINDEN HILLS HOME REMODEL / ADDITION

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME ADDITION / REMODEL

LINDEN HILLS HOME ADDITION / REMODEL

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

LINDEN HILLS HOME ADDITION / REMODEL

LINDEN HILLS HOME ADDITION / REMODEL

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com
 

Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

FAIRWIND CABIN

FAIRWIND CABIN

This cabin was first imagined in 1970 when the family of four made their first trip to Lake Superior. They have loved the informal feel of the simple buildings, their intimate and direct connection to the land, the filtered views of the lake through the birch, the rugged permanence of the shoreline and the boundless horizon across the water. A new cabin needed to comfortably accommodate 15 people and the more typical two to five.

This cabin expresses and supports the ongoing ritual of renewal. Two buildings separate functions and allow for “smaller living” for fewer people. Both buildings use copper clad roof forms to shelter and shape the space and direct views opening to the immediate and distant landscape. The main building celebrates the immediate landscape along the south with a wall of stainless steel window frames forming internal shelves to hold favorite things. To the east the ground slopes away and the deck extends out providing a place for a direct connection to the powerful lake and endless horizon.

The “link” between is an unexpected space.  While sheltered between the two buildings, there is a sence of stepping outside each time you pass.  It has become a favorite spot for quite time and conversation. 

The bunkhouse first floor is protective and enclosing. Upstairs creates a totally new experience for the family with a panoramic “in the tree canopy” view. The playful ceiling stiffens the building and echoes the lake and the sky reminding them that the lake will each time wear them down, smooth and soften them again.

Location: Knife River, Minnesota
Project Size: 2150 sf.
Completed: 2004

Photographer:  Don Wong                          www.donwongphoto.com

Architect:
Ben Awes AIA

  COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

     COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

 

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

     COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

 

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

     COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

 

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

     COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

 

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

     COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

 

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

     COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

 

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

     COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

 

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

     COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

 

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

     COCONUT BATH   Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.  We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.   A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.  2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

 

COCONUT BATH

Built in 1963, the house was originally designed by Lorenzo Williams. Phase one of this project focused on the master bedroom and bath which had experienced a number of remodels over the years. The area had been broken up into small spaces, many of which were cramped and dark, and some unused. We attempted to honor and highlight the strong architectural details already present. Notable was the architectural “box” expression of the exterior, each box separated by a full height recessed window. The interior walls floated between the floor and ceiling by use of a deep black reveal. The experience of the “boxes” and your understanding of where you were in the space were lost in the labyrinth of walls.

We combined the spaces on the west side of the house to create a master wing. We removed walls and millwork to fully reveal the exquisite living room fireplace, and then used the fireplace to reinforce a natural movement spine through the house. You no longer have to walk through the middle of the living room to get the master bedroom.

 A new walnut clad “interior” box placed at the end of the central hallway highlights the master suite.  The box contains the bath and separates the bedroom from the changing room. The box, while filling the central part of the space, serves to unify the space by being an object within it. The position of the bath re-aligns the space around the full height vertical windows that now define the edge of the bath and the bedroom, and cast light along both the exterior and interior walls.  A broad skylight is cut into the ceiling bringing a new quality of light to the room. We liken the bath to a coconut, dark and woodsy on the outside, crisp and white on the inside.

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA   

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Chistian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Chistian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

 

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

Treehouse Extension

Treehouse Extension

The owners of this 1980’s era home were looking for a strikingly modern and natural light filled addition / renovation that would both accommodate a kitchen extension and create open flowing main floor living space connecting their formerly enclosed and separate kitchen and dining areas to their existing vaulted living room.  The design reflects the homeowners clean modern aesthetic and reinforces their desire for open living areas with abundant daylight and exterior views.

The design solution encourages a sense of place and responds to the surrounding context by emphasizing visual connections between the exterior and interior, culminating in the orientation of a new kitchen / dining space toward a tree top view to the south-east at the back of the house.  It features a new front entry expansion which formally foreshadows the new kitchen addition at the rear.  It includes a new modern kitchen and master bath, as well as a new mud room and laundry room.  Natural daylight and access to exterior views were increased thru the addition of floor to ceiling windows & sliding doors, skylights, cable rails, and strategically re-built exterior decks.

Location:  Minnetonka, MN
Original Size:  1,828 SF
Size with Addition:  2,007 SF
Completed:  June 2012

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

2014 RAVE AWARD WINNER

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL     
  
 
  
  This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA      

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA      

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA      

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA      

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA      

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA      

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

  MID-CENTURY REMODEL   This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.  Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.  This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA   

MID-CENTURY REMODEL

This design is the final and unifying renovation in a series of updates to a dated mid-century home along the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The project features a flexible multi-purpose basement family room, a new floating stair visually connecting the formerly isolated and dark basement to the main floor living space, three updated bathrooms, and a new mudroom / laundry room.

Expanding upon the material palette and design language of a very refined and modern kitchen renovation and exterior update (completed previously by a different architect and landscape designer and featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Midwest Home), this final phase of work emphasizes brightening the interior space and the use of natural daylight throughout. Strategies include the use of increased window opening sizes, translucent glass walls, and skylights to allow natural light deeper into formerly dark interior spaces. The material palette features light colored bamboo floors and Baltic birch paneling (to match the existing Scandinavian blonde woodwork) as well as highly reflective glossy material selections for the bathroom wall tile, cabinetry, and powder coated steel stair structure.

This renovation project builds on the homeowners adventurous, elegant, modern design sensibility with the use of translucent glass bathroom walls and doors, which transform bathrooms into light transmitting filters between the home exterior and formerly dark interior spaces.  The refined and subtle design sensibility of previous renovations is carried forward with a quiet, neutral palette that emphasizes lightness, reflectivity, and textural variation.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

 

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

Opposite Natures

Opposite Natures

Growing out of the need for a 21st century expansion and update to their 1938 Southwest Minneapolis bungalow, this addition/renovation is the result of a new balance between interior experience and exterior form. Taking cues from the clean modern aesthetic that had been fostered by the residents on the interior, this home transformation results in a distinct and reduced house form that references both the modern and the vernacular. The sharp, distilled domestic exterior form encloses a contrasting white, light-filled and diffuse interior space - resulting in something taut and modern that fits comfortably within the scale and character of the ‘traditional’ neighborhood. New direct and indirect connections between inside and outside abound with the addition of window boxes, privacy louvers, translucent glass, clerestory windows and skylights - allowing light in and views out from multiple heights and perspectives, transforming inside spaces that previously felt cellular and inwardly focused to flowing, open and connected to the outside.

Photographer: 
James Schwartz www.schwartzpictures.com

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
hristian Dean AIA

 

  Project Team:   Bob Ganser AIA,   Principal-In-Charge   Ben Awes AIA   Christian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

  Project Team:   Bob Ganser AIA,   Principal-In-Charge   Ben Awes AIA   Christian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

  Project Team:   Bob Ganser AIA,   Principal-In-Charge   Ben Awes AIA   Christian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

  Project Team:   Bob Ganser AIA,   Principal-In-Charge   Ben Awes AIA   Christian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

  Project Team:   Bob Ganser AIA,   Principal-In-Charge   Ben Awes AIA   Christian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

  Project Team:   Bob Ganser AIA,   Principal-In-Charge   Ben Awes AIA   Christian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA

Private Kitchen

Private Kitchen

This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.

Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Christian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.  Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Christian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA

This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.

Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Christian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.  Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Christian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA

This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.

Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Christian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.  Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Christian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA      

This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.

Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Christian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 

 

 This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.  Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Christian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA      

This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.

Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Christian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 

 

 This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.  Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Christian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA      

This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.

Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Christian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 

 

 This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.  Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Christian Dean AIA Bob Ganser AIA      

This charming 1930's bungalow had always been maintained in wonderfully original condition - except for the kitchen. It had been updated in the 70's with a motif featuring false roughhewn cedar boards and plastic brick on the walls. There was enough room for only one person in the u-shaped space and the silverware drawer had to be opened to allow the oven door to pass. The owner did not want to add square footage to the house, and was interested in combining the kitchen and dining room into one space to open it up.

Typically the most expensive room in the house to remodel, our design begins with cost efficient and well-designed IKEA cabinets. We transform them with elegant Silestone countertops and stainless steel bar stock edging and trim. The dining room buffet is suspended off the wall and supports a 2 ½" thick 11 foot long Montana walnut top. Storage is maximized by recessing cabinets into existing walls when extra inches are needed. Originally dark and cramped, the space becomes light and spacious. Both kitchen and dining are used more often and now the two connected spaces can comfortably accommodate the homeowners and their guests.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Christian Dean AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

 

 

 Before Photos   

Before Photos

 

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

 Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Chistian Dean AIA

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Chistian Dean AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

FAMILIAR CABIN

FAMILIAR CABIN

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

LOTUS LAKE HOME

LOTUS LAKE HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

LOTUS LAKE HOME

LOTUS LAKE HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

LOTUS LAKE HOME

LOTUS LAKE HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

LOTUS LAKE HOME

LOTUS LAKE HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

LOTUS LAKE HOME

LOTUS LAKE HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

LOTUS LAKE HOME

LOTUS LAKE HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

LOTUS LAKE HOME

LOTUS LAKE HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

LOTUS LAKE HOME

LOTUS LAKE HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Christian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
Krista Jensen
Gayla Lindt

 

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
Krista Jensen
Gayla Lindt

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
Krista Jensen
Gayla Lindt

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
Krista Jensen
Gayla Lindt

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
Krista Jensen
Gayla Lindt

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
Krista Jensen
Gayla Lindt

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
Krista Jensen
Gayla Lindt

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
Krista Jensen
Gayla Lindt

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

SWEENEY LAKE HOUSE

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
Krista Jensen
Gayla Lindt

 Project Team: Chistian Dean AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Chistian Dean AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Chistian Dean AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Chistian Dean AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Chistian Dean AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Chistian Dean AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

 Project Team: Chistian Dean AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Bob Ganser AIA  

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA
 

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                             www.chadholder.com

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

EDINA HOME

EDINA HOME

Photographer:  Chad Holder                           www.chadholder.com

Project Team:
Chistian Dean AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Bob Ganser AIA

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL      
  
 
  
  Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE   A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.  The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment.   The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            Edina, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE

A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.

The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment. 

The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          Edina, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE   A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.  The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment.   The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            Edina, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE

A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.

The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment. 

The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          Edina, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE   A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.  The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment.   The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            Edina, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE

A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.

The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment. 

The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          Edina, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE   A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.  The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment.   The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            Edina, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE

A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.

The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment. 

The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          Edina, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE   A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.  The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment.   The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            Edina, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE

A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.

The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment. 

The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          Edina, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE   A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.  The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment.   The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            Edina, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE

A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.

The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment. 

The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          Edina, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE   A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.  The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment.   The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            Edina, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE

A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.

The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment. 

The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          Edina, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE   A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.  The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment.   The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            Edina, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE

A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.

The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment. 

The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          Edina, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE   A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.  The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment.   The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            Edina, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

INSIDE OUTSIDE POOLSIDE

A family that spends a lot of time in and around their beautiful saltwater pool, did not have a place in their home that provided them a visual or physical connection.  They also lacked any storage for all their pool “stuff”.  With small children and a love for entertaining, they needed a room that served and supported their watery lifestyle.  We took over an empty and unused notch along the back of the house adjacent to the pool patio to create a new bright and airy pool house.

The new out building attempts to unify 4 areas; an existing deck, an upper master bedroom balcony, a lower lawn, and the pool itself, and provide the missing storage.  By locating the pool house at the juxtaposition of these areas, the new room was able to provide a new expanded rooftop balcony for the master, anchor and define the dining and barbeque deck, extend and connect to the pool and patio, and create a new access to integrate the lower lawn – and carve out the much needed storage for the variety of pool toys and equipment. 

The building itself is 400 sf with bath, laundry, storage, mechanical, kitchen, and living.  A single new secure connection is made into the house through the existing mudroom.  Clad with crisply detailed ship lap cedar, it draws on the existing material palate of the house and nods to the boat aesthetic in expression and efficiency.  With pocketing glass walls the pool house is both the utility building needed, and an expansion of the vibrant pool scene itself, inside and outside, along the poolside.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          Edina, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

 This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Nate Dodge

This 1958 split-level home featured a kitchen typical of its era - small and cut off from the rest of the home. In the traditional enclosed kitchen of these older houses, seating space is limited. Where the kitchen tends to be the place of the home for family gatherings and get togethers, an inviting, wide-open floor plan became the solution. The addition of a three-season screened back porch presented a design challenge, requiring a variance from the city of Edina. The city appreciated the sensitivity to the neighborhood in the fact that it wasn’t a tear down.

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Nate Dodge

  INDEPENDENCE HOUSE   Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.  The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.       
  
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  Location:            Independence, MN  Completed:     June 2014    
  
 
  
    Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge Michelle Ney         
  
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INDEPENDENCE HOUSE

Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.

The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.

 

Location:          Independence, MN

Completed:     June 2014

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge
Michelle Ney

 

 

 

 

 

 

  INDEPENDENCE HOUSE   Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.  The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.     Location:            Independence, MN  Completed:     June 2014  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge Michelle Ney

INDEPENDENCE HOUSE

Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.

The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.

 

Location:          Independence, MN

Completed:     June 2014

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge
Michelle Ney

  INDEPENDENCE HOUSE   Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.  The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.     Location:            Independence, MN  Completed:     June 2014  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge Michelle Ney

INDEPENDENCE HOUSE

Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.

The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.

 

Location:          Independence, MN

Completed:     June 2014

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge
Michelle Ney

  INDEPENDENCE HOUSE   Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.  The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.     Location:            Independence, MN  Completed:     June 2014  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge Michelle Ney

INDEPENDENCE HOUSE

Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.

The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.

 

Location:          Independence, MN

Completed:     June 2014

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge
Michelle Ney

  INDEPENDENCE HOUSE   Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.  The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.     Location:            Independence, MN  Completed:     June 2014  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge Michelle Ney

INDEPENDENCE HOUSE

Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.

The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.

 

Location:          Independence, MN

Completed:     June 2014

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge
Michelle Ney

  INDEPENDENCE HOUSE   Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.  The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.     Location:            Independence, MN  Completed:     June 2014  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge Michelle Ney

INDEPENDENCE HOUSE

Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.

The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.

 

Location:          Independence, MN

Completed:     June 2014

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge
Michelle Ney

  INDEPENDENCE HOUSE   Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.  The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.     Location:            Independence, MN  Completed:     June 2014  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge Michelle Ney

INDEPENDENCE HOUSE

Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.

The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.

 

Location:          Independence, MN

Completed:     June 2014

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge
Michelle Ney

  INDEPENDENCE HOUSE   Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.  The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.     Location:            Independence, MN  Completed:     June 2014  Project Team: Bob Ganser AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Ben Awes AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge Michelle Ney

INDEPENDENCE HOUSE

Located on the site of a former farmhouse, this compact modern home takes formal and material cues from the landscape and agricultural structures of the surrounding area. The massing of the home is monolithic to the north and west, protecting it from prevailing winter winds. Openings were selectively placed to allow some filtered northern light, and framed views of the wetland to the east, with the primary focus of the large window areas being toward the south. Deep overhangs prevent solar heat gain during summer months, while floor to ceiling glass allows sunlight deep into the spaces of the home during winter months.

The primary shed-like forms of the building further relate to local agricultural structures in a material and textural sense. The home is constructed with thermal mass concrete walls and corrugated core-ten siding. Inside the home features materials such as hand scraped wood and stained plywood floors. All cabinetry in the kitchen and bathrooms, as well as bedroom closets were designed using IKEA products – as a means of keeping the overall cost of the project down.

 

Location:          Independence, MN

Completed:     June 2014

Project Team:
Bob Ganser AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Ben Awes AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge
Michelle Ney