Skyway Retreat

Skyway Retreat

The skyway represents who we are, and what we want to be as a business. It requires a point of view that sees possibility instead of obstacle. There are always plenty of reasons to say no, but there are more reasons to say yes. Often, when a decision is placed before us we do not have all the data required to be absolutely sure. A new idea does not immediately reveal all the potential ramifications. New ideas move us to action with a force that is hard to quantify, but is fundamental to our business. We are driven to the uncovering of ideas and the creation of new relationships: new relationships between building and landscape, new relationships between people and space. The skyway requires a new idea: a new use, a new environment, a new relationship between object and person, passage becomes place, bridge becomes building.

The Skyway retreat is an idea that expanded from a found object with a concern for sustainability, an interest in preservation, a collaborative and collective vision of retreat, and a passion for the North Shore of Lake Superior.

The Skyway, Designed by architect Ed Baker, the "father of the skyways," and built in 1978, previously connected JC Penny's to Powers department stores above 5 th Street in downtown Minneapolis. An architectural icon of the Twin Cities, the skyway was a place of movement, a place of connection, and most importantly, a place of transition.

Rethought, transformed, and 30 years later, the steel and glass bridge that once linked Minneapolis now calmly rest on the edge of the Iron Range and the taconite mines. The skyway has evolved into a place of rest, a place of meditation, and a place of interaction between you, others, and the environment. Once a bridge in the city, the Skyway Retreat is now a bridge to a whole new experience.

Nothing exists anywhere in the region like the Skyway Retreat, and this will happen only once; a chance to rewrite a piece of history, to preserve a Twin Cities' architectural icon, and to experience Lake Superior and the North Shore through a truly singular modern retreat.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
 

  The skyway represents who we are, and what we want to be as a business. It requires a point of view that sees possibility instead of obstacle. There are always plenty of reasons to say no, but there are more reasons to say yes. Often, when a decision is placed before us we do not have all the data required to be absolutely sure. A new idea does not immediately reveal all the potential ramifications. New ideas move us to action with a force that is hard to quantify, but is fundamental to our business. We are driven to the uncovering of ideas and the creation of new relationships: new relationships between building and landscape, new relationships between people and space. The skyway requires a new idea: a new use, a new environment, a new relationship between object and person, passage becomes place, bridge becomes building.    The Skyway retreat is an idea that expanded from a found object with a concern for sustainability, an interest in preservation, a collaborative and collective vision of retreat, and a passion for the North Shore of Lake Superior.    The Skyway, Designed by architect Ed Baker, the "father of the skyways," and built in 1978, previously connected JC Penny's to Powers department stores above 5 th Street in downtown Minneapolis. An architectural icon of the Twin Cities, the skyway was a place of movement, a place of connection, and most importantly, a place of transition.    Rethought, transformed, and 30 years later, the steel and glass bridge that once linked Minneapolis now calmly rest on the edge of the Iron Range and the taconite mines. The skyway has evolved into a place of rest, a place of meditation, and a place of interaction between you, others, and the environment. Once a bridge in the city, the Skyway Retreat is now a bridge to a whole new experience.    Nothing exists anywhere in the region like the Skyway Retreat, and this will happen only once; a chance to rewrite a piece of history, to preserve a Twin Cities' architectural icon, and to experience Lake Superior and the North Shore through a truly singular modern retreat.   Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

The skyway represents who we are, and what we want to be as a business. It requires a point of view that sees possibility instead of obstacle. There are always plenty of reasons to say no, but there are more reasons to say yes. Often, when a decision is placed before us we do not have all the data required to be absolutely sure. A new idea does not immediately reveal all the potential ramifications. New ideas move us to action with a force that is hard to quantify, but is fundamental to our business. We are driven to the uncovering of ideas and the creation of new relationships: new relationships between building and landscape, new relationships between people and space. The skyway requires a new idea: a new use, a new environment, a new relationship between object and person, passage becomes place, bridge becomes building.

The Skyway retreat is an idea that expanded from a found object with a concern for sustainability, an interest in preservation, a collaborative and collective vision of retreat, and a passion for the North Shore of Lake Superior.

The Skyway, Designed by architect Ed Baker, the "father of the skyways," and built in 1978, previously connected JC Penny's to Powers department stores above 5 th Street in downtown Minneapolis. An architectural icon of the Twin Cities, the skyway was a place of movement, a place of connection, and most importantly, a place of transition.

Rethought, transformed, and 30 years later, the steel and glass bridge that once linked Minneapolis now calmly rest on the edge of the Iron Range and the taconite mines. The skyway has evolved into a place of rest, a place of meditation, and a place of interaction between you, others, and the environment. Once a bridge in the city, the Skyway Retreat is now a bridge to a whole new experience.

Nothing exists anywhere in the region like the Skyway Retreat, and this will happen only once; a chance to rewrite a piece of history, to preserve a Twin Cities' architectural icon, and to experience Lake Superior and the North Shore through a truly singular modern retreat.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

  The skyway represents who we are, and what we want to be as a business. It requires a point of view that sees possibility instead of obstacle. There are always plenty of reasons to say no, but there are more reasons to say yes. Often, when a decision is placed before us we do not have all the data required to be absolutely sure. A new idea does not immediately reveal all the potential ramifications. New ideas move us to action with a force that is hard to quantify, but is fundamental to our business. We are driven to the uncovering of ideas and the creation of new relationships: new relationships between building and landscape, new relationships between people and space. The skyway requires a new idea: a new use, a new environment, a new relationship between object and person, passage becomes place, bridge becomes building.    The Skyway retreat is an idea that expanded from a found object with a concern for sustainability, an interest in preservation, a collaborative and collective vision of retreat, and a passion for the North Shore of Lake Superior.    The Skyway, Designed by architect Ed Baker, the "father of the skyways," and built in 1978, previously connected JC Penny's to Powers department stores above 5 th Street in downtown Minneapolis. An architectural icon of the Twin Cities, the skyway was a place of movement, a place of connection, and most importantly, a place of transition.    Rethought, transformed, and 30 years later, the steel and glass bridge that once linked Minneapolis now calmly rest on the edge of the Iron Range and the taconite mines. The skyway has evolved into a place of rest, a place of meditation, and a place of interaction between you, others, and the environment. Once a bridge in the city, the Skyway Retreat is now a bridge to a whole new experience.    Nothing exists anywhere in the region like the Skyway Retreat, and this will happen only once; a chance to rewrite a piece of history, to preserve a Twin Cities' architectural icon, and to experience Lake Superior and the North Shore through a truly singular modern retreat.   Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

The skyway represents who we are, and what we want to be as a business. It requires a point of view that sees possibility instead of obstacle. There are always plenty of reasons to say no, but there are more reasons to say yes. Often, when a decision is placed before us we do not have all the data required to be absolutely sure. A new idea does not immediately reveal all the potential ramifications. New ideas move us to action with a force that is hard to quantify, but is fundamental to our business. We are driven to the uncovering of ideas and the creation of new relationships: new relationships between building and landscape, new relationships between people and space. The skyway requires a new idea: a new use, a new environment, a new relationship between object and person, passage becomes place, bridge becomes building.

The Skyway retreat is an idea that expanded from a found object with a concern for sustainability, an interest in preservation, a collaborative and collective vision of retreat, and a passion for the North Shore of Lake Superior.

The Skyway, Designed by architect Ed Baker, the "father of the skyways," and built in 1978, previously connected JC Penny's to Powers department stores above 5 th Street in downtown Minneapolis. An architectural icon of the Twin Cities, the skyway was a place of movement, a place of connection, and most importantly, a place of transition.

Rethought, transformed, and 30 years later, the steel and glass bridge that once linked Minneapolis now calmly rest on the edge of the Iron Range and the taconite mines. The skyway has evolved into a place of rest, a place of meditation, and a place of interaction between you, others, and the environment. Once a bridge in the city, the Skyway Retreat is now a bridge to a whole new experience.

Nothing exists anywhere in the region like the Skyway Retreat, and this will happen only once; a chance to rewrite a piece of history, to preserve a Twin Cities' architectural icon, and to experience Lake Superior and the North Shore through a truly singular modern retreat.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

  The skyway represents who we are, and what we want to be as a business. It requires a point of view that sees possibility instead of obstacle. There are always plenty of reasons to say no, but there are more reasons to say yes. Often, when a decision is placed before us we do not have all the data required to be absolutely sure. A new idea does not immediately reveal all the potential ramifications. New ideas move us to action with a force that is hard to quantify, but is fundamental to our business. We are driven to the uncovering of ideas and the creation of new relationships: new relationships between building and landscape, new relationships between people and space. The skyway requires a new idea: a new use, a new environment, a new relationship between object and person, passage becomes place, bridge becomes building.    The Skyway retreat is an idea that expanded from a found object with a concern for sustainability, an interest in preservation, a collaborative and collective vision of retreat, and a passion for the North Shore of Lake Superior.    The Skyway, Designed by architect Ed Baker, the "father of the skyways," and built in 1978, previously connected JC Penny's to Powers department stores above 5 th Street in downtown Minneapolis. An architectural icon of the Twin Cities, the skyway was a place of movement, a place of connection, and most importantly, a place of transition.    Rethought, transformed, and 30 years later, the steel and glass bridge that once linked Minneapolis now calmly rest on the edge of the Iron Range and the taconite mines. The skyway has evolved into a place of rest, a place of meditation, and a place of interaction between you, others, and the environment. Once a bridge in the city, the Skyway Retreat is now a bridge to a whole new experience.    Nothing exists anywhere in the region like the Skyway Retreat, and this will happen only once; a chance to rewrite a piece of history, to preserve a Twin Cities' architectural icon, and to experience Lake Superior and the North Shore through a truly singular modern retreat.   Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

The skyway represents who we are, and what we want to be as a business. It requires a point of view that sees possibility instead of obstacle. There are always plenty of reasons to say no, but there are more reasons to say yes. Often, when a decision is placed before us we do not have all the data required to be absolutely sure. A new idea does not immediately reveal all the potential ramifications. New ideas move us to action with a force that is hard to quantify, but is fundamental to our business. We are driven to the uncovering of ideas and the creation of new relationships: new relationships between building and landscape, new relationships between people and space. The skyway requires a new idea: a new use, a new environment, a new relationship between object and person, passage becomes place, bridge becomes building.

The Skyway retreat is an idea that expanded from a found object with a concern for sustainability, an interest in preservation, a collaborative and collective vision of retreat, and a passion for the North Shore of Lake Superior.

The Skyway, Designed by architect Ed Baker, the "father of the skyways," and built in 1978, previously connected JC Penny's to Powers department stores above 5 th Street in downtown Minneapolis. An architectural icon of the Twin Cities, the skyway was a place of movement, a place of connection, and most importantly, a place of transition.

Rethought, transformed, and 30 years later, the steel and glass bridge that once linked Minneapolis now calmly rest on the edge of the Iron Range and the taconite mines. The skyway has evolved into a place of rest, a place of meditation, and a place of interaction between you, others, and the environment. Once a bridge in the city, the Skyway Retreat is now a bridge to a whole new experience.

Nothing exists anywhere in the region like the Skyway Retreat, and this will happen only once; a chance to rewrite a piece of history, to preserve a Twin Cities' architectural icon, and to experience Lake Superior and the North Shore through a truly singular modern retreat.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA

  The skyway represents who we are, and what we want to be as a business. It requires a point of view that sees possibility instead of obstacle. There are always plenty of reasons to say no, but there are more reasons to say yes. Often, when a decision is placed before us we do not have all the data required to be absolutely sure. A new idea does not immediately reveal all the potential ramifications. New ideas move us to action with a force that is hard to quantify, but is fundamental to our business. We are driven to the uncovering of ideas and the creation of new relationships: new relationships between building and landscape, new relationships between people and space. The skyway requires a new idea: a new use, a new environment, a new relationship between object and person, passage becomes place, bridge becomes building.    The Skyway retreat is an idea that expanded from a found object with a concern for sustainability, an interest in preservation, a collaborative and collective vision of retreat, and a passion for the North Shore of Lake Superior.    The Skyway, Designed by architect Ed Baker, the "father of the skyways," and built in 1978, previously connected JC Penny's to Powers department stores above 5 th Street in downtown Minneapolis. An architectural icon of the Twin Cities, the skyway was a place of movement, a place of connection, and most importantly, a place of transition.    Rethought, transformed, and 30 years later, the steel and glass bridge that once linked Minneapolis now calmly rest on the edge of the Iron Range and the taconite mines. The skyway has evolved into a place of rest, a place of meditation, and a place of interaction between you, others, and the environment. Once a bridge in the city, the Skyway Retreat is now a bridge to a whole new experience.    Nothing exists anywhere in the region like the Skyway Retreat, and this will happen only once; a chance to rewrite a piece of history, to preserve a Twin Cities' architectural icon, and to experience Lake Superior and the North Shore through a truly singular modern retreat.   Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA

The skyway represents who we are, and what we want to be as a business. It requires a point of view that sees possibility instead of obstacle. There are always plenty of reasons to say no, but there are more reasons to say yes. Often, when a decision is placed before us we do not have all the data required to be absolutely sure. A new idea does not immediately reveal all the potential ramifications. New ideas move us to action with a force that is hard to quantify, but is fundamental to our business. We are driven to the uncovering of ideas and the creation of new relationships: new relationships between building and landscape, new relationships between people and space. The skyway requires a new idea: a new use, a new environment, a new relationship between object and person, passage becomes place, bridge becomes building.

The Skyway retreat is an idea that expanded from a found object with a concern for sustainability, an interest in preservation, a collaborative and collective vision of retreat, and a passion for the North Shore of Lake Superior.

The Skyway, Designed by architect Ed Baker, the "father of the skyways," and built in 1978, previously connected JC Penny's to Powers department stores above 5 th Street in downtown Minneapolis. An architectural icon of the Twin Cities, the skyway was a place of movement, a place of connection, and most importantly, a place of transition.

Rethought, transformed, and 30 years later, the steel and glass bridge that once linked Minneapolis now calmly rest on the edge of the Iron Range and the taconite mines. The skyway has evolved into a place of rest, a place of meditation, and a place of interaction between you, others, and the environment. Once a bridge in the city, the Skyway Retreat is now a bridge to a whole new experience.

Nothing exists anywhere in the region like the Skyway Retreat, and this will happen only once; a chance to rewrite a piece of history, to preserve a Twin Cities' architectural icon, and to experience Lake Superior and the North Shore through a truly singular modern retreat.

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA