NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL      
  
 
  
  Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge

 

  NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL    Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.  The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside.   The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.  The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.  Photographer:  Brandon Stengel www.farmkidstudios.com   Location:            St. Louis Park, MN  Completed:     2013  Project Team: Ben Awes AIA,  Principal-In-Charge  Bob Ganser AIA Christian Dean AIA Nate Dodge   

NEW LIFE AT THE SPLIT-LEVEL

Built in the mid 60’s, this wonderful split level home had been updated over the years.  Unusual to this era of home, the kitchen, living, and dining are in an area 40’ long by 16’ wide, creating an experience of being close to the outdoors.  The one space that was never updated was the entry.  Small and cramped, it was the only place in the house that was on “ground level”, yet also the most disconnected from the outside. Three elements were identified and distilled to respond to this condition, connecting the house to the ground through the entry experience.

The floor plane:  Here we built a new raised front patio and paved the surface, including the entry landing, and the treads and risers, with a course bluestone ceramic paver.  The continuation of this surface, flowing inside and out, highlights the “split” in the home as the place of connection to the outside. 

The wrapper:  We struck two lines marking this in-between zone of the landing; a strong existing window line of the basement level, and the new ceiling plane of the entry aligned with the top of the new interior railing.  Below this zone is glass, drawing your attention to the ground, allowing the floor to visually move inside and out.  Above, a wood surface wraps the interior and defines the entry.  The pattern, laser etched into the wood, references the ashlar of the existing stone and transforms from wall to screen as it moves around the space.

The sky:  The old entry was short, dim, and confined.  The new entry rises up and brings light over the full entry stairwell, filling the center of the house.  The front monumental window is always dappled by the mature oak that anchors the site.

Photographer:  Brandon Stengelwww.farmkidstudios.com

Location:          St. Louis Park, MN

Completed:     2013

Project Team:
Ben Awes AIA, Principal-In-Charge
Bob Ganser AIA
Christian Dean AIA
Nate Dodge